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What constitutes false sex assault allegations?

Being far away from home and family while living on a college campus can be an adventurous and rewarding experience. However, more often than not, it is typically very challenging in any number of ways. Probably, one of the worst things that can happen to you at college is facing false accusations of a crime. If a falsely alleged crime involves sex assault allegations, it may prove disastrous, not only for your college career, but your personal life and potential future professional life as well.

University of Virginia rape case shows impacts of false allegations

It was the piece in the Rolling Stone that caught the attention of the nation. A reporter followed the story of a young woman that claimed to be the victim of a fraternity gang rape on the campus of the University of Virginia. The resulting piece, "A Rape on Campus," hit newsstands at the end of 2014.

I Want My Phone Call

The police have you sitting in an interrogation room in Wisconsin, and they tell you that they want you to make a statement. You invoke your Fifth Amendment right to remain silent, and refuse to discus anything without an attorney (which is exactly what you should do). "That's fine," they tell you. "We're arresting you and taking you to the county jail." At this point you might be a little nervous, not just about what the police are talking about but letting your family and friends know where you are. "I know my rights, I want my phone call." You tell the officers. You know you can call people, have them get ready to post your bond, make arrangements for your kids, or even just have someone call you into work. The officers refuse and bring you straight to jail. Have you just had your rights violated?

You're 18, Right?

As a firm that specializes in sex crimes, we talk with clients almost every day who have, like most of the general public, misconceptions about the law. The area of sex crimes is no difference, and in many cases, this area may have more misconceptions than any other area of law. One area that frequently comes up is charges related to sexual interaction with an individual who is a minor. There are many common misconceptions when it comes to dealing with minors, the biggest of which is how whether or not you know that an individual is under eighteen years old.

What is "Disorderly Conduct"?

Disorderly Conduct is one of the most commonly charged offenses in Wisconsin. That's in part because it is classified as a Class B misdemeanor, which is really the lowest classification--the lowest level--of criminal behavior in Wisconsin. If a person is charged criminally with just Disorderly Conduct, it means that in the State's view, the person's conduct has just crossed the line into the territory of criminal conduct. It's also probably in part because Disorderly Conduct can be charged as a municipal ordinance violation. If a person is charged with a municipal ordinance violation, that means the State has decided that a person's conduct may have been unlawful, but not criminal. A municipal ordinance violation is a forfeiture level offense, as opposed to a criminal offense. What's the difference between a forfeiture violation and a criminal violation? A criminal violation means that a person could be penalized by being put in jail, or put on probation, as well as possibly being made to pay a fine. A monetary fine is also known as a forfeiture. A forfeiture offense is punishable by a forfeiture--being made to pay a fine--but not by jail or probation.

The Scoop on Sex Offender Registration in Wisconsin

Our office does a substantial amount of work in the area of sex offenses. The consequences of being convicted of a sex offense can be severe and not only because of a potential jail or prison sentence. In Wisconsin, as in many other states, individuals convicted of sex offenses, as defined by the law, must comply with the requirements of the sex offender registry. The court also has the discretion to order a person to register as a sex offender if he is convicted of other crimes if the court finds that the offense was sexually motivated. That is, there are some crimes for which sex offender registration is mandatory, and there are others for which the court may, but is not required to, order registration.

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