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Criminal Defense Archives

Homicide does not only refer to murder

Many individuals consider taking another human life to be a deplorable and unforgivable act. However, some events in which a person dies may not necessarily have come about due to a conscious decision to cause fatal injuries. You may have found yourself in a situation where authorities suspect that your actions may have led to the death of another individual, but you likely did not set out to cause such injuries.

Criminal defense in the age of social media

The popularity of Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter have changed how we obtain information about suspected illegal activity. Before, the media was the primary factor that shaped our opinions about crime. Now, social media is quickly becoming the news source of choice for most people.

Criminal Prosecution and Witness Credibility

When a crime is being prosecuted, there inevitably are witnesses involved. This may include people involved in a crime, or who witnessed certain actions, and in some cases this people who were involved in other aspects such as a doctor who treated injuries, or a police officer who helped investigate aspects of the case. Despite the dramatic depiction of people storming into a courtroom, witnesses only appear at trial or at evidentiary hearings. Each side is required to disclose its witnesses prior to trial, giving the prosecution and the defense the opportunity to prepare for what witnesses may or may not say when taking the witness stand.

NOT ALL MURDERS ARE CREATED EQUAL: Lesser Included Offenses

Homicide charges can involve all sorts of circumstances that make a difference in how that case is treated by the legal system. While many cases are originally charged as 1st degree intentional homicides--the most serious of form of homicide--they often resolve with convictions for less serious types of homicide. One common way that this can happen is through a plea bargain, where the State and the Defendant agree to reduce the original charge to a less serious charge in exchange for a guilty plea by the Defendant. But a second way in which someone can be convicted of a less serious version of the offense for which they are charged with is by having the jury convict them of a lesser-included offense.

Can I get my case off CCAP?

Wisconsin has one of the most publicly-used criminal case databases in the country with Wisconsin Circuit Court Access Program, or CCAP, for short. Want to know if the guy you started dating has a criminal history? Run him through CCAP. What about if you're a landlord and want to figure out a tenant's likelihood of failing to pay? CCAP them and see if they've got a history of being sued. All sorts of uses (and abuses) of such a public database exist. Most commonly, when clients have cases dismissed or acquitted at jury trial, they want to know -- is there any way I can remove it from CCAP?

Can I serve my jail time at home?

The possibility of jail time is an anxiety-producing thought for many people. Accordingly, a common question I receive from clients is whether they're eligible for house arrest - meaning, can they serve their jail sentences at home? The answer, generally, is that it depends on a number of things.

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